Latex paint finishing tips smooth-How to Get a Smooth Professional Paint Finish on Furniture - Houseful of Handmade

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links. I receive a small commission at no cost to you when you make a purchase using my link. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. After getting the master bathroom vanity built and finished, I was a little tired. But now I am ready to get back to work.

Latex paint finishing tips smooth

Latex paint finishing tips smooth

Latex paint finishing tips smooth

First time hearing about Floetrol, but the result is so beautiful. Cancel reply Keep the conversation going! I tend to use a foam brush when I paint or varnish. Then I started painting once, rwice and I am ready for the final layer. But in painting, as in everything else, practice makes perfect. Be aware that polyurethane with yellow over time so it is not a good idea to use in on white or light colored paint. Do you have any suggestions as to how Latex paint finishing tips smooth go about doing so? Now it is time for Anime girl masturbation images third coat.

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Home Guides SF Gate. I will never choose a different product for doors interior and trim! It Foxy girl sex possible to Laatex a smooth finish with a paint brush or paint roller, but you have to have the right paintbrushes. This post may contain affiliate links for your convenience. If you fill dmooth in, you will be marked as a spammer. I have tried to skip the sealer a few times on tabletops and in no time the paint became scratched Latex paint finishing tips smooth discolored. I hope you will keep coming back for more tips and inspiration. For example, grit is considered a matte finish, satin and high gloss. All rights reserved. I use Purdy brushes. I have noticed changes to the detriment of almost all oil based. If the roller needs more primer, roll it lightly back down, dip the bottom in the primer and roll it back up. You can read my full disclosure policy here.

Although oil-based paint is renowned for its smooth finish, it has drawbacks, including strong odor, slow drying time and messy cleanup.

  • The invention of the paint roller changed the wall painting world.
  • You have an old furniture piece ready to bring to new life.
  • E-Mail us and let us know what you think.
  • Several years ago, I discovered the beauty of painted furniture.
  • Spray paint out of an aerosol can acts differently than brushing on latex paint.

Although oil-based paint is renowned for its smooth finish, it has drawbacks, including strong odor, slow drying time and messy cleanup. Latex paint is much easier to use, making it the product most favored by do-it-yourself painters. Achieving a smooth finish with latex demands proper surface preparation and use of the right paint and tools. By observing special painting techniques for both wall and trim, you can produce professional-looking results.

A smooth painted finish depends as much on surface preparation as on painting technique. Begin by sponging the walls with an all-purpose cleanser mixed with water. Nail holes, dents or gouges in the drywall or trim should be filled with spackling compound then sanded smooth. If dirt or dust remains on the wall, it will get into your wet brush and mar your paint job. Many painters mix a paint conditioner into latex paint to improve its spreadability. Look for a product made specifically for the type of paint you are using, whether its flat wall latex or trim enamel.

Because a conditioner is a thinner, applying too much to the paint will make it drippy and decrease surface coverage. The smoothest paint finishes are achieved by keeping a wet edge as you paint. Applying only as much pressure as is required to release the paint onto the wall will help you avoid built up ridges of paint. A good quality paint roller cover is also essential to achieving a smooth finish on a painted wall.

When painting trim, your goal should be to keep the brush well-loaded with paint, but not to the point that it is dripping. Avoid trying to force paint out of a brush when it becomes too dry, because it can cause brush strokes to show up in your finished paint job. Gwen Bruno has been a full-time freelance writer since , with her gardening-related articles appearing on DavesGarden. She is a former teacher and librarian, and she holds a bachelor's degree in education from Augustana College and master's degrees in education and library science from North Park University and the University of Wisconsin.

Skip to main content. Home Guides Home Home Improvement. Preparation A smooth painted finish depends as much on surface preparation as on painting technique.

Conditioners Many painters mix a paint conditioner into latex paint to improve its spreadability. Walls The smoothest paint finishes are achieved by keeping a wet edge as you paint. Trim When painting trim, your goal should be to keep the brush well-loaded with paint, but not to the point that it is dripping. About the Author Gwen Bruno has been a full-time freelance writer since , with her gardening-related articles appearing on DavesGarden.

Accessed 27 October Bruno, Gwen. How to Achieve Smooth Latex Paint. Home Guides SF Gate. Note: Depending on which text editor you're pasting into, you might have to add the italics to the site name. Customer Service Newsroom Contacts.

By using an inexpensive paint grid and some tips from the pros, you can roll flawlessly smooth walls. Be sure to review our Frequently Asked Questions page. Misc Mortising Equip. Please do not reproduce other Lovely Etc. Thnks for the advice.

Latex paint finishing tips smooth

Latex paint finishing tips smooth. with Scott Sidler

We wanted to match the paint of the existing baseboard trim exactly. Although you can match a paint color to any brand of paint, we decided for the perfect match and the perfect sheen to use the exact paint our builder used for the rest of the trim. The color is Divine White. It was the most expensive gallon of paint I have ever purchased, but you can tell immediately it is quality paint.

In addition to quality paint, the secret ingredient to my smooth paint finish is Floetrol. It is a paint conditioner for latex paints designed to make the paint application smoother and reduce brush strokes. It totally works! I painted all the battens with a brush and they dried with an ultra smooth finish. Floetrol does not water-down the paint, but it makes it smoother and you can tell it applies differently. Floetrol can reduce the sheen of the paint slightly.

I did not notice a difference with the satin finish paint, but it is probably more noticeable with gloss. For oil-based paints use Penetrol. I think another important key for getting a smooth finish is to use quality brushes. Using an angled brush is a must for painting trim. I use Purdy brushes. They are some of the more expensive brushes you will see at the home center or paint store, but they are high quality and will last a long time.

There is a little paint residue on my cleaned brushes, but I tell you those bristles are still baby soft and ready for the next paint job. Sherry, from Young House Love, tipped me off to using a short-handled brush. It has been a game-changer. I used to always clench my brushes at the base of the handle. For me the short-handled brush is so much more comfortable to hold and maneuver with.

I have much better control with the short-handle. The opinions in this post are my own. I was not compensated for writing this post or any of the opinions contained within it. This post contains affiliate links. I may receive a commission on purchases made after following an affiliate link. After reading this book I can't wait to shop my own home and make more meaningful purchases. These are really good tips. I discovered Floetrol through Centsational Girl, she uses it for painting furniture.

I also want to try your tip and use the short handle brush. My trim looks better with the Floetrol but I defiantly think I higher quality paint will do the trick to an even better finish. What a great idea! And so timely…. How much of the Floetrol do you use? Karen, the directions are on the Floetrol. It does not require a lot. I only have the gallon size because my local paint store was out of the quart size. You can find it at your local big box hardware store too.

In the paint section in the smaller sizes. A little goes a long way! And Jackie is spot on it is the secret ingredient. But make sure you get a quality paint as well. Awesome and timely tip. I am currently working on repainting many scratched wood window sills and other trim in our house.

I did not know about the Floetrol additive! So excited to try it. I agree about the quaility of Sherwin Williams paint. I also agree about the short-handled brushes. A saleperson at Home Depot tipped me off about that! Thanks for the Floetrol tip! A paint strainer is an inexpensive nylon sock that fits over the top of the plastic bucket and removes small globs that are common in primer and in paint. Put a small amount of primer into a wide-mouthed cup and brush on a coat of primer around the ceiling and along the edges of the room with a good-quality tapered paintbrush.

If you find it difficult to brush a straight line at the ceiling, try an edge-painting tool. Brush around the ceiling and edges to form a border about 3 inches wide.

Fit a sturdy roller cage with a high-quality roller cover. Insert a roller grid into the 5-gallon bucket of primer and fit the top hooks of the grid over the lip of the bucket to hold it securely. Pros use roller grids for two reasons: They can carry more paint with them in the large buckets as they work, and the grids leave an even amount of paint on the roller, which reduces drips and runs on the walls.

Attach the roller cage to an extension pole and dip the paint roller in the primer until the roller cover is just submerged.

Roll the paint roller up the side of the grid to remove excess primer. If the roller needs more primer, roll it lightly back down, dip the bottom in the primer and roll it back up. The grid holds and evenly distributes the primer over the roller cover without leaving excess on the roller. Each roller-dip of primer should cover about the same amount of wall space. If you have to stop, finish an entire wall and then take a break.

Roll the room with primer and let it dry before applying the paint. Pour the leftover primer back into its container, wash the 5-gallon bucket, the paint roller and the paint grid thoroughly, and let them dry. Brush on the paint around the edges and around the windows.

For a professional look, most walls require at least two light coats of paint. Roll the topcoat paint on the primed walls, just as you rolled on the primer. Roll within 1 inch of vertical door trim and corners and within 2 inches of the ceiling. Let the first coat of paint dry completely before cutting in with a brush once more around the room corners and door trim.

Follow with a second rolled-on coat of paint.

How to Get a Smooth Paint Finish without a Paint Sprayer - Pretty Handy Girl

In our new section called " Ask Old Town Home " you have the opportunity to ask and have your questions answered to the best of our ability. Today's topic comes courtesy of Jen from Harrisonburg, Virginia. My question is about how to get a smooth finish when painting wood furniture. I used the instructions from another blog perfectly and even used the exact paint that she raved about Zinsser primer and Ben Moore Metal and Wood paint, low lustre in black.

As suggested in the other blog, I used a foam roller to apply the paint which gave the paint an awful, rough texture on the wood. This was unexpected, and not what the blogger had promised. It almost felt like the roller was coming off in tiny pieces and adhering to the paint on the dresser! After the first coat dried, I ended up sanding most of the roughness off and re-applying another coat with a paintbrush which left bristle marks.

Do you have any tips that could make my life easier when I tackle my next furniture-painting project this summer? I love the look of painted furniture, but I'm afraid to get the same result again! Thanks, Jen. This is a great question, and one that we have a lot more first hand experience with now then we did at this time last year. Our information largely comes courtesy of our recent experience painting our salvaged front door and French doors last summer.

We wanted as smooth and as high gloss of a finish as we could accomplish on our own, so I ended up doing a lot of research on the best possible methods and paints to achieve this look. This information can be generically applied to painting furniture or just about any wood surface.

Here's what we learned:. The smoothness of finish on paint depends on three important factors: surface prep; the type and brand of paint and primer you use; and the methods and tools used for applying the paint. Taking a short cut or not selecting the correct approach in any of these areas with be quite detrimental to your final project, and even if you do everything right, you may still have a hard time.

Essentially, obtaining a perfectly smooth finish in paint is hard, and it can be darn near impossible to achieve with a roller and brush. So there you have it. In our opinion, the combination of diligent prep work, high quality paint and primer, and the right tools for the job can leave you with the perfectly smooth finish you're looking for. But if you're insistent on a smooth-as-glass finish, this is the way we recommend you go.

Well, what do you think of our advice? What were your secrets to a job well done? Any assistance you can offer in the realm of "smooth paint" would be of a great help to other readers and me. Do you have a question?

Disclaimer: Ask Old Town Home is meant simply as a friendly bit of advice and is provided free of charge. It is your responsibility to fully research any and all items related to projects or suggestions to ensure proper safety and code precautions and regulations are fully followed. In other words, any advice we provide is just our opinion, and our opinion is only worth the price we charge for it. Penetrol extends the drying time and lets the paint flatten out to a mirror surface.

Paint in general terms is made for what would be an average room temperature or outdoor temperature for the market where those paints are sold. The problem is, whenever there is a deviation in temperature either up or down that paint will be more difficult to brush out or roll on to the wall.

Indoor water based paints, Emulsions or Latex tend to dry too fast when the temperature is warmer than average, and the result of this is that each new section painted can have streaks because the piece before has dried out too quickly. You mention that "several places in most cities offer spray services. You just bring the furniture in, choose the paint color, and their professional painters often autobody painters will gladly take on a little extra work for a few extra dollars.

Do you have any suggestions as to how to go about doing so? Just had wood work professionally painted and it is rough and chalky to the touch. I want it to be smooth like it was before. What needs to be done. This tutorial is amazing! So perfect for a beginner like me. I really appreciate the detail. I am painting a dresser and just finished my first coat of paint. I used an extender and almost everything feels smooth but looks streaky.

Is this what you meant by the first coat of paint will look bad? Thanks for this tutorial!! I'm not a professional, but a homeowner who has done a lot of painting. Paints are harder to work with these days because of VOC regulations. My favorite, Ben. Moore Satin Impervo can't be used straight from the can anymore. I add 20 percent Penetrol to help minimize bursh marks..

As for primer, I've had good results with an old standby — Kilz. I tried Zinsser oil primer hyped a lot in blogs and hated it. It looked like corduroy when dry and was very hard to sand out. In the can, it was as thick as tar and took forever to stir.

Luckily, I didn't use it on my whole door after how I saw it perform on touch-ups. I put the lid back on and went and got another can of Kilz Original for my unfinished cabinet doors. It sands satiny smooth.

It only houses an electric coal effect fire, so heat will not be a problem. And would love my lovely surround to be returned to its original white. God Bless I'm moving to a new house, and my new room has a built-in-desk that is painted. I absolutely love the color, it matches the whole room. But my problem is I don't like the texture of it, but I don't want to re-paint it because I'm scared of getting the wrong color. Is there a way to make it smooth without having to re-paint?

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Alert box notification is currently enabled, please follow this link to disable alert boxes for your session profile. Old Town Home. Wednesday, May 23, Comments Here's what we learned: Old Town Home's Answer: The smoothness of finish on paint depends on three important factors: surface prep; the type and brand of paint and primer you use; and the methods and tools used for applying the paint.

Surface Prep Last summer we covered the extensive process we used to prepare the surface of our doors for paint. After all, there's no way you'll get a smooth finished surface if the wood you're applying it to is rough and bumpy. There are two aspects of surface prep that matter in achieving a smooth finish. The first is the prep you do prior to your first coat of primer, and the second is the prep you do between coats of primer or paint.

Prior to priming, I like to use sandpaper in several stages, typically starting with grit and working my way up to a grit paper done all done by hand. The smoothness left on bare wood after a nice grit sanding is almost silky to the touch.

We'll cover primer selection in the next section, but once the primer is dry you'll move onto the between coat surface prep. Projects Paint. Tomato and Chive Quinoa Salad. Wonderful answer to a difficult question. I just wanted to add to the comments about HVLP spray painting.

The expense of an HVLP spray system seems more daunting than it really is, especially if you already own an air compressor. Even small pancake compressors are often sufficient for medium sized paint jobs i. Note: the other guns sold at Harbor Freight should be avoided.

Additionally, spraying outside is a very viable alternative to building a spray booth in your garage or basement.

There is very little overspray, and often an old tarp to protect the concrete path in the back yard is all that I use. The amount knowledge needed to get good looking finishes from an HVLP sprayer is also deceptive.

It is much less complicated than it appears, especially if you only want to do one type of finish e. It even comes with a companion DVD demonstrating the techniques discussed in the text.

Awesome, thank you for the additional information!

Latex paint finishing tips smooth

Latex paint finishing tips smooth