Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy-Cancer during pregnancy - Canadian Cancer Society

Skip to Content. Cancer during pregnancy is uncommon. But when it does occur, it can be complicated for the mother and the health care team. Cancer itself rarely affects the growing baby directly. But doctors must be selective about how they diagnose and treat pregnant women with cancer.

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

It showed that the children were still fertile they will be able Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy conceive or produce children of their own and no nerve or psychological problems were found. Secretaries being fucked PSTTs do not spread to other sites in the body. This is because they do not directly expose Annormal fetus to radiation. The type of treatment and when it may be given Abnormall on many factors: the location of the cancer the type of cancer the stage of the cancer how old the fetus is how long the woman has been pregnant the wishes of the mother. During pregnancy, fetal size can be estimated in different ways.

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Hyperemesis Nausea and vomiting cslls common complaints during pregnancy, especially during the early months. If necessary, colposcopies are done at regular intervals during pregnancy. What to Expect Enlarge. There are many reasons for preterm labor; however, in most cases the exact cause of early labor is not known. Screening can help find changes in cervical cells, so you can receive the proper follow-up and treatment you may need, to stay healthy. It can cause particular Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy with future pregnancies. Questions about cancer? Symptoms of Miscarriage Common signs Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy a miscarriage include: Vaginal bleeding Abdominal or pelvic cramping or pain Lower back pain Tissue that passes from the vagina While most women who have vaginal spotting or bleeding during the early stages of their pregnancy have healthy babies, bleeding is the most common symptom ggowth a miscarriage. Who is Finger baning sluts solo sex ideal candidate for amniocentesis? Therefore, early detection of the problem is very important. CIN is not cancer, but may become cancer and spread to nearby normal Victoria secret sheer lingerie if not treated. Druing and Treating Birth Defects: What You Need to Know While some birth defects can be prevented through prenatal care, it's important to know what treatments may exist if your fetus is diagnosed with a birth defect. Counseling can help both you and your partner if you have pregnajcy dealing with ceells feelings after a miscarriage. It may also be called CIN 1. About one in 50 pregnancies is ectopic and any woman can be at risk.

Most cases of persistent GTD are invasive moles, but in rare cases they are choriocarcinomas or placental site trophoblastic tumors see below.

  • Your health care provider may recommend a variety of screenings, tests and imaging techniques during your pregnancy.
  • As a woman of child-bearing age, you have likely had your fair share of Pap smears.
  • A miscarriage is a loss of pregnancy during the first 20 weeks.
  • Most women who have abnormal cervical screening test results do not have cervical cancer.
  • When you are invited for your test, you should let your GP or clinic know that you are pregnant.
  • Give advice on women's health concerns.

Cancer during pregnancy is rare. We expect that the number of women diagnosed with cancer while pregnant will increase because more women are waiting until they are older to have children and the risk of developing most cancers increases with age. Because there is not a lot of information available about cancer during pregnancy, making decisions that are right for you can be hard. There are many issues to consider. You may worry that cancer or its treatment will affect your well-being and the well-being of the baby.

You may also worry about the effect of tests to diagnose cancer on the well-being of your baby. Some cancer treatments are safe for the fetus during pregnancy or only during certain times of pregnancy. Others are not safe for the fetus at any time. Most cancers do not spread from a woman to the fetus even though some may spread to the placenta. Recent improvements in treatments and careful monitoring provide safer conditions for pregnant women with cancer so that it is more likely that the baby will be successfully delivered with good outcomes.

It is important to know that a pregnant woman with cancer can give birth to a healthy baby. Pregnancy itself does not cause cancer, and pregnant women do not have an increased risk of developing cancer compared to women who are not pregnant. Some of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy include: breast the most common cervical Hodgkin lymphoma non-Hodgkin lymphoma ovarian malignant melanoma leukemia thyroid colorectal.

Other types of cancer such as brain, bone and lung can occur when a woman is pregnant, but they are very rare. Many symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating, rectal bleeding, fatigue and headaches are common during pregnancy. Occasionally, these symptoms can also be related to a particular type of cancer. It is important to talk with your doctor about symptoms if they continue or happen at a time during the pregnancy when it is no longer considered typical. Sometimes pregnancy can uncover cancer earlier than it would otherwise have been found.

For example, a Pap test done as part of routine care during pregnancy can find cervical cancer. An ultrasound done during pregnancy may find ovarian cancer at an early stage. If cancer is suspected, women and their doctors are often concerned about using tests to diagnose cancer because of potential harm to the fetus. For example, you may be worried about the radioactivity in tests such as x-rays, CT scans or nuclear medicine tests.

But some of these tests can be used safely during pregnancy, giving your doctor extra information to best manage your cancer. Research has shown that the level of radiation in an x-ray with appropriate shielding used to diagnose cancer is too low to harm the fetus.

CT scans use a higher level of radiation than routine x-rays and are much more accurate at showing internal organs and structures. They can be very helpful in making a diagnosis of cancer or the spread of cancer. But CT scans of the abdomen or pelvis should only be done if absolutely necessary to plan for your cancer therapy.

Whether these tests cause harm to the fetus depends on the stage of pregnancy, the number and type of x-rays used, the amount of radiation used and if the fetus is shielded from the radiation. MRIs and ultrasounds are considered safe during pregnancy because they do not use radiation. Physical exams and many biopsies are also safe and important tools to diagnose cancer.

Treating cancer during pregnancy is very complex. Many people think that having treatment for cancer will always harm the mother or the baby. In the past, the doctor often recommended not to continue with to terminate the pregnancy because of this concern.

Before being treated for cancer and throughout your pregnancy, your obstetrician will assess the age of the fetus, maturity of the fetus and expected delivery date to help plan your treatment and ensure the baby is growing properly. The healthcare team will look at the best treatment options for the mother, balancing this with possible risks to the fetus.

The treatment options for a pregnant woman with cancer are the same as those of the non-pregnant woman with cancer, but how and when the treatment is given may need to be changed. The type of treatment and when it may be given depends on many factors: the location of the cancer the type of cancer the stage of the cancer how old the fetus is how long the woman has been pregnant the wishes of the mother.

Treatment is tailored to each woman. Cancer treatments used during pregnancy may include surgery, chemotherapy and sometimes radiation therapy, but these are only used after careful thought and planning to ensure the safety of both the mother and the baby. Some cancer treatments can harm a fetus, especially during the first 3 months of pregnancy, called the first trimester. This is when the baby develops its body structure and organs. Sometimes cancer treatment may be delayed until later in the pregnancy, during the second or third trimester.

When cancer is diagnosed later in a pregnancy, sometimes it may be possible to wait to start treatment until after the baby is born. The doctor may also consider inducing, or bringing on, labour early. For some very early stage cancers, such as very early stage cervical cancer, it may be safe to continue the pregnancy to term and delay treatment until after the baby is born.

In some situations, the woman, and the doctor need to discuss whether or not to continue with the pregnancy. Providing treatment right away may be the safest option for some women with more advanced or aggressive cancers found early in a pregnancy. Generally, surgery poses the least risk to the fetus and may be considered the safest cancer treatment option for some cancers, especially after the first trimester. Improvements in surgery and anesthetics, and careful monitoring of the mother and baby, make it possible to lessen the risks to both mother and baby.

Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to treat cancer. It is a systemic therapy. This means that the drug travels throughout the body and destroys cancer cells.

Chemotherapy and other drugs used to treat cancer are toxic and have the potential to harm a fetus, especially if they are given during the first trimester of pregnancy, when the organs of the fetus are developing. Chemotherapy during the first trimester can cause birth defects and low birth weights or may cause a woman to miscarry. The risk of birth defects when chemotherapy is given during the first trimester varies according to the chemotherapy used.

Some effects of chemotherapy and other drug therapies on a fetus are not known, especially for newer drugs like biological therapies or targeted therapies. Because there has not been much long-term follow-up of children exposed to chemotherapy in the uterus, there is not a lot of information about long-term effects on, for example, thinking ability and brain and behaviour development. One recent study followed children up to It showed that the children were still fertile they will be able to conceive or produce children of their own and no nerve or psychological problems were found.

Some chemotherapy and other drugs may be given during the second and third trimesters without causing harm to the fetus. Protection is provided by the placenta. The placenta develops during pregnancy and connects the blood supplies of the mother and baby.

It provides nutrients and removes waste products. It also acts as a barrier between the mother and the fetus that many chemotherapy drugs cannot pass through. But chemotherapy given during the second and third trimesters is associated with early labour and low birth weight. Chemotherapy and other drug therapies can also cause health problems in the woman such as infection, anemia or nausea and vomiting.

These problems can indirectly harm a fetus. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays or particles to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumours. Whether or not radiation therapy can be used in the second or third trimester depends on the dose of radiation and the area of the body being treated. When radiation therapy is possible, careful planning is used when treating pregnant women with cancers that are far away from the pelvis such as breast cancer or head and neck cancers.

Lead shields or blocks are used to reduce as much as possible the amount of radiation the fetus is exposed to. Radiation therapy for breast cancer can usually be delayed until after the baby is born. Cancers in the pelvis in a pregnant woman cannot be treated effectively with radiation therapy without causing severe problems for the fetus.

In this case, for a woman who is between 1 and 26 weeks pregnant, the doctor will often recommend not to continue with the pregnancy. And radiation is usually not recommended regardless of the stage of pregnancy. Possible effects on the fetus during this time include malformation of the organs, small brain, mental retardation, developmental delays, stunted growth and other growth abnormalities.

The International Commission on Radiological Protection has developed guidelines for safe radiation exposure during pregnancy. If the fetus is exposed to more than this amount, the doctor will recommend that the pregnancy be terminated. The prognosis for a pregnant woman with cancer is often the same as for women of the same age with the same type and stage of cancer. In general, most cancers do not negatively affect a pregnancy, and pregnancy does not affect the cancer outcome.

But the treatments for cancer may have a harmful effect on the fetus. If a cancer diagnosis is not found early because of pregnancy, these women may have a poorer overall prognosis than women who are not pregnant and are diagnosed earlier. Pregnancy may affect the behaviour of some cancers. For example, hormone changes that occur during pregnancy may stimulate some cancers, such as malignant melanoma, to grow.

The effects of cancer on the fetus are still largely unknown, but it seems that cancer only rarely has a direct effect on the fetus. Only a few cancers can spread from the mother to the fetus. These include malignant melanoma, small cell lung cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia. If the cancer has not spread to the newborn, then no preventive, or prophylactic, treatment will be given to the baby.

Cancer cells cannot pass to the infant through breast milk. But chemotherapy and other drugs can be transferred to the baby, and this can cause harm. Also, radioactive substances that are taken as a drink or a pill such as radioactive iodine used to treat thyroid cancer can also get into the breast milk and harm the baby.

So women being treated for cancer are often advised not to breastfeed. Call us toll-free at Or write us. We will reply by email or phone if you leave us your details. If we are not able to reach you by phone, we will leave a voicemail message. Read more. Learn more.

Select the text below and copy the link. Cancer during pregnancy Types of cancer Diagnosing cancer during pregnancy Cancer treatment during pregnancy Prognosis Effect of cancer on the fetus Breastfeeding.

Abdominal ultrasound. The average fetal heart rate is between and beats per minute. Candidates include women who will be over age 35 at the time of delivery or those who have had an abnormal maternal serum screening test. Understanding Cancer. These images show how cervical cells that have long-lasting infections with high-risk HPV can change over time and become abnormal.

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy. Cervical screening during pregnancy

By doing this, your doctor can more effectively determine what lead to the abnormal result and decide if and how they should proceed with treatment. If your doctor determines that your abnormal Pap smear result did stem from the presence of cancerous cells, you will need to wait until after your pregnancy to receive treatment. If you are early in your pregnancy, your doctor may recommend that you end the pregnancy to seek the treatment you require.

If the presence of these cells is discovered late in your pregnancy, your doctor may induce labor early as to treat the condition as quickly as possible. The presence of abnormal cells in your cervix poses no risk to your baby.

As American Pregnancy reports, in many cases, these cells are washed away during labor and delivery. If your doctor suspects that anything about your Pap smear result may pose a risk to your baby, he may suggest a C-section delivery; however, this recommendation is quite rare.

Erin Schreiner is a freelance writer and teacher who holds a bachelor's degree from Bowling Green State University. She has been actively freelancing since Schreiner previously worked for a London-based freelance firm. Her work appears on eHow, Trails. She currently teaches writing to middle school students in Ohio and works on her writing craft regularly.

During Pregnancy Treatment If you receive an abnormal Pap smear result while pregnant, your doctor will likely perform a colposcopy, reports American Pregnancy. Diabetes is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in your blood. Glucose is a sugar that is your body's main source of energy. Health problems can occur when your glucose levels are too high.

When diabetes starts during pregnancy it is called gestational diabetes and it is of special concern. Gestational diabetes can occur when no risk factors or symptoms are present; therefore, pregnant women are tested for this condition.

Gestational diabetes can potentially harm the health of your baby, so it is important to monitor your glucose levels closely. By working together, you and your doctor can control your glucose level to help ensure you have a safe pregnancy and a healthy baby. If you develop gestational diabetes, you will be monitored closely during your pregnancy. Your doctor will conduct regular tests to detect any problems early so that steps can be taken to correct them. These tests may include:.

A kick count is a record of how often you feel your baby move. You may be asked to keep track of this movement in the latter part of pregnancy and to contact your doctor if your baby is not active. Normal blood pressure levels are key to good health. When your blood pressure becomes too high, it is known as hypertension. This condition can pose serious health risks at any time. During pregnancy, hypertension can cause added problems.

In some cases, preeclampsia, a serious disorder that can affect your pregnancy and your health, may develop. Preeclampsia can have serious side effects for you and your baby; therefore, it is important to be aware of its warning signs.

If you have any of these symptoms, talk with your doctor right away:. If you develop preeclampsia during your pregnancy, you will need special medical care. Doctors do not know why some women get preeclampsia; however, they do know that certain women are at higher risk. The risk of developing preeclampsia is increased in women who:. If you know you have high blood pressure, there are steps you can take before and during your pregnancy to reduce the chance that preeclampsia will harm you or your baby.

Before your pregnancy, you can:. Working with your doctor to control your blood pressure level will help improve your chances of having a healthy baby. If your blood pressure increases slightly during your pregnancy, bed rest at home or in the hospital may help keep preeclampsia from developing. If preeclampsia does develop, the only real treatment is to have the baby because continuing the pregnancy can result in damage to your organs, including your kidneys, liver, brain, heart, and eyes.

Although preeclampsia typically lasts for up to two weeks after delivery, it always goes away after a pregnancy. The decision to deliver the baby depends on the risks to you and whether the risk to your baby is greater staying inside your uterus or in a special nursery.

Your doctor will explain the best and safest way for the delivery to occur. The providers of Capital Women's Care seek the highest quality medical and ethical standard in an environment that nurtures the spirit of caring for every woman.

Our premier group consists of more than physicians, nurse practitioners, physician's assistants and certified nurse midwives.

Together, we offer women many choices for both general obstetric and gynecologic care and specialized women's health care services. If you need to speak with your physician, please contact that office directly. To be considered for employment opportunities with Capital Women's Care, please visit our Careers page on Indeed.

About News Contact. Abnormal Pregnancy. Miscarriage A miscarriage is a loss of pregnancy during the first 20 weeks. Genetic Causes Most first-trimester miscarriages are caused by chromosomal errors that occur when the fetus is first forming.

The Woman's Health Preexisting health conditions can also cause you to miscarry. Possible conditions that can cause a miscarriage include: Infections that affect the uterus or the fetus Problems with your hormones Chronic diseases such as diabetes, especially if they are not controlled prior to pregnancy An abnormally shaped uterus An incompetent cervix Bleeding disorders There is no proof that working, exercising, having sex, using of birth control pills, most accidental falls, or morning sickness cause miscarriages.

Risk Factors There are several risk factors that may increase your chances of a miscarriage. These include: Increasing age, especially age 35 and older A history of two or more miscarriages Nonprescription NSAID such as ibuprofen or naproxen use when you become pregnant or early in your pregnancy Alcohol or drug use during pregnancy Cigarette smoking during pregnancy Exposure to dangerous chemicals before or during pregnancy Heavy caffeine use during pregnancy Certain gynecological problems, such as uterine fibroids or other abnormalities of the uterus Disease or infection during pregnancy Physical trauma After the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, when a fetal heartbeat is seen on ultrasound, the risk of miscarriage drops significantly.

Symptoms of Miscarriage Common signs of a miscarriage include: Vaginal bleeding Abdominal or pelvic cramping or pain Lower back pain Tissue that passes from the vagina While most women who have vaginal spotting or bleeding during the early stages of their pregnancy have healthy babies, bleeding is the most common symptom of a miscarriage.

Diagnosing a Miscarriage If you have any symptoms of a miscarriage, call your doctor right away. Treating a Miscarriage There is no proven medical treatment to stop a miscarriage that has already started.

Coping With The Loss It is normal to go through a grieving process after a miscarriage, regardless of the length of your pregnancy. Ectopic Pregnancy In a normal pregnancy, the fertilized egg travels through the fallopian tube into the uterus and implants itself. Who Is At Risk About one in 50 pregnancies is ectopic and any woman can be at risk. This may be present in women who have had: Pelvic inflammatory disease Previous ectopic pregnancy Infertility Pelvic or abdominal surgery Endometriosis Sexually transmitted disease STD Prior tubal surgery, such as tubal ligation Other factors that can increase a woman's risk of an ectopic pregnancy include: Cigarette smoking Exposure to DES during your mother's pregnancy Increased age Symptoms Early symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy sometimes are similar to the symptoms of pregnancy, such as tender breasts or an upset stomach.

As an ectopic pregnancy progresses, you may have: Abnormal vaginal bleeding Abdominal or pelvic pain Shoulder pain Weakness, dizziness, or fainting If you have any of these symptoms, call your doctor, even if you do not think you are pregnant. Diagnosis An ectopic pregnancy can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages. To determine if you have an ectopic pregnancy, your doctor may: Perform a pelvic exam Check your blood pressure and pulse Perform an ultrasound exam Test your blood for increased hormone levels Treatment If your ectopic pregnancy is in its early stages and your fallopian tube has not ruptured, medication can be used to stop the growth of the pregnancy.

After An Ectopic Pregnancy Once you have had an ectopic pregnancy, you have an increased risk for future ectopic pregnancies. Hyperemesis Nausea and vomiting are common complaints during pregnancy, especially during the early months. What You Can Do There is no guaranteed way to prevent morning sickness; however, studies have shown that if you are taking a multivitamin regularly at the time you become pregnant, you are less likely to have a severe case of morning sickness.

There are also some things you can do to relieve mild morning sickness: Get plenty of rest. Avoid smells that bother you. Eat five or six small meals a day instead of three large ones. Avoid spicy and fatty foods. Eat crackers before you get out of bed in the morning. Medical Treatment If your nausea and vomiting become severe, you may need medical treatment.

Be sure and call your doctor if: You have a small amount of urine and it is dark in color. You cannot keep down liquids. You are dizzy or faint when you stand up. You have a racing or pounding heart. You vomit blood. Preterm Labor The normal length of a pregnancy is 40 weeks. Signs of Preterm Labor Because serious illness or death can occur if a baby is born too early, it is important to be alert to the warning signs of preterm labor.

If any of these warning signs occurs, don't wait - call your doctor's office or go directly to the hospital: Change in type of vaginal discharge Increase in the amount of discharge Pelvic or lower abdominal pain Constant, low, dull backache Mild abdominal cramps, with or without diarrhea Regular or frequent contractions or uterine tightening, often painless Ruptured membranes water breaking In many cases, if preterm labor is detected early, delivery can be prevented or postponed through the use of medication and by limiting activity.

Women At Risk Some women are at greater risk for preterm labor than others. Risk factors for preterm labor include: Preterm labor or a preterm birth in a previous pregnancy Smoking cigarettes or using cocaine Carrying more than one baby Abnormal cervix Abnormal uterus Abdominal surgery during your pregnancy Infection during your pregnancy Bleeding during the second or third trimester of your pregnancy Being underweight Mother or grandmother took DES during pregnancy Little or no prenatal care Having a child with chromosomal disorders About one in ten babies born in the United States is preterm.

What You Can Do If you are at risk for preterm labor, be sure to get early prenatal care and follow a healthy diet and exercise plan. There are things you can do to have a healthy pregnancy: Get regular prenatal care.

Eat healthy foods and do not skip meals. Lead a healthy lifestyle. Be alert to signs of preterm labor. Follow your doctor's advice. Gestational Diabetes Diabetes is a condition that causes high levels of glucose in your blood. Working With Your Doctor By working together, you and your doctor can control your glucose level to help ensure you have a safe pregnancy and a healthy baby. These tests may include: Ultrasound uses sound waves to create pictures of your baby, allowing your doctor to check the baby's growth and development.

Electronic fetal monitoring helps your doctor detect signs of problems your baby may be having late in pregnancy. A biophysical profile uses electronic fetal monitoring and ultrasound results to assess the well-being of your baby.

Preeclampsia Normal blood pressure levels are key to good health. Signs of Preeclampsia Preeclampsia can have serious side effects for you and your baby; therefore, it is important to be aware of its warning signs.

If you have any of these symptoms, talk with your doctor right away: Headaches Vision problems Rapid weight gain Swelling of the hands and face If you develop preeclampsia during your pregnancy, you will need special medical care.

Risk Factors Doctors do not know why some women get preeclampsia; however, they do know that certain women are at higher risk. The risk of developing preeclampsia is increased in women who: Are pregnant for the first time Have had preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy Have a history of chronic hypertension Are 35 years or older Are carrying more than one fetus Have certain medical conditions, such as diabetes or kidney disease Are obese Are African American Have certain blood diseases or immune disorders, such as lupus What You Can Do If you know you have high blood pressure, there are steps you can take before and during your pregnancy to reduce the chance that preeclampsia will harm you or your baby.

Before your pregnancy, you can: Work with your doctor to lower your blood pressure. Lose weight through diet and exercise, if needed. Take blood pressure medication as prescribed. Ask your doctor if your blood pressure medication is safe to use during pregnancy.

Intrauterine Growth Restriction (Fetal Growth Abnormality) | ColumbiaDoctors - New York

Jump to content. Pregnancy does not seem to increase the progression of abnormal cervical cell changes. The presence of abnormal cervical cell changes or HPV does not affect the outcome of the pregnancy. Close monitoring is needed so that you and your health professional can make the best treatment decisions at each stage of the pregnancy. An abnormal Pap test may be evaluated further with colposcopy. Colposcopy is a safe test during pregnancy. If colposcopy shows normal tissue, then a repeat Pap test or colposcopy may be done later.

Having a second test depends on the type of abnormalities reported on the first Pap test. If colposcopy confirms abnormal tissue areas, a cervical biopsy may be done to diagnose the abnormal tissue. This level of testing is also done to make sure cervical cancer , which is rare, is not present. If a cervical biopsy is needed during pregnancy, it does not usually cause problems with the pregnancy, though the risk of bleeding is greater after the first trimester. Minor cell changes should continue to be monitored during the pregnancy and after delivery.

Many minor cell changes return to normal after delivery. Moderate to severe cell changes shown on an abnormal Pap test are always evaluated by colposcopy, and possibly cervical biopsy, to diagnose the abnormal tissue and to make sure invasive cervical cancer is not present.

Follow-up Pap tests and colposcopy may be done for the rest of the pregnancy to monitor the progression of the cell changes. Moderate to severe changes can be monitored closely, and treatment can wait until after delivery. In rare cases, a procedure called a cone biopsy is needed to rule out cancer. Invasive cervical cancer must be treated as soon as possible. It is harder to manage because of the concern for the outcome of both the woman and her pregnancy. Treatment will be managed by a team of health professionals who specialize in cancer and high-risk pregnancies.

Kiley MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology. Author: Healthwise Staff. This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use.

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Top of the page. Abnormal Pap Test While Pregnant. Topic Overview Pregnancy does not seem to increase the progression of abnormal cervical cell changes. Related Information Abnormal Pap Test. Credits Current as of December 19, Current as of: December 19,

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy

Abnormal growth cells during pregnancy