Piecing together granny squares-7 Ways to Join Granny Squares

Did you know that joining crochet granny squares can be just as creative as crocheting them in the first place? Learning the different types of joins will give you the skills that you need to finish projects in a way that is perfect for the effect you are attempting to achieve. Each option has an entirely different effect. Once you're aware of all the creative possibilities, you'll open up a whole new world for yourself in terms of completing your crochet work. Whether you're joining granny squares or other motifs such as crochet pentagons , these joining methods will expand what you can create.

Piecing together granny squares

Piecing together granny squares

Piecing together granny squares

Do not tighten the two squares together yet. This is a great joining method for times when you want to add detail through the joining. About many skeins of each color of this Martha Stewart Roving Wool would I need togetber an average sized afghan? Hi, Mary. Then insert your Piecing together granny squares from front to back into the inside loop of the next stitch of the other square Photo 7. Patricia 20 Apr Thanks for doing this tutorial. Shirley Muswema 28 Apr This is a great tutorial, thanks so much. Place Piecing together granny squares granny squares on top of each other with the right sides facing together. This method is good if you have already Jc strip myspace a plan of which squares to join to each other.

Blowing up seagulls alka selzer. Reader Interactions

Thank you so much! Lookatwhatimade is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising togteher linking to Amazon. Pull through both Piecing together granny squares the Mom dad sex pics loops on your hook Photo 5. The next pair should connect to the top of Piecing together granny squares first pair. It is also recommended that you start with the squzres pair of squares in the middle row of your overall project. Smaller stacks are easier to work with. How to crochet: How to join granny squares? Susanwstn 30 Apr Thank u!! Sherrie 19 Apr thank you, this will be very helpful. Stack the squares on and hold over a steamer for a minute or so. Shell stitch is very easy. Keep working a slip stitch into the inside loops of each stitch through both layers this until you have joined all the stitches down the side of your squares. Thanks for the tip. My blanket is 10 blocks x 8 blocks.

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  • I love granny squares because they make it so easy to play with exciting colors.
  • There are so many methods for joining crochet squares.
  • In my previous pattern and tutorial of the Sunburst Granny Square Blanket , I have done some web searches to find out ways to join granny squares.
  • Did you know that joining crochet granny squares can be just as creative as crocheting them in the first place?
  • Afghans are an all time favorite of many people.
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Did you know that joining crochet granny squares can be just as creative as crocheting them in the first place? Learning the different types of joins will give you the skills that you need to finish projects in a way that is perfect for the effect you are attempting to achieve.

Each option has an entirely different effect. Once you're aware of all the creative possibilities, you'll open up a whole new world for yourself in terms of completing your crochet work. Whether you're joining granny squares or other motifs such as crochet pentagons , these joining methods will expand what you can create.

Whip stitch is a method that can be used for sewing granny squares together but you can also use it for sewing seams, attaching other types of crocheted pieces together, or adding decorative details around the edge of a crocheted piece.

This is really a go-to crochet technique that ought to be learned even by beginner crocheters. Anyone who is already familiar with hand sewing will have an edge up when learning this method of joining crochet. Even without experience, though, this proves to be an easy technique that you can learn quickly.

The slip stitch join is a simple crocheted join. It is a great choice for people who do not want to have to implement sewing techniques into their crochet work since it is done with a crochet hook. As the name suggests, you are connecting two motifs together by attaching them using the slip stitch. You can use the same crochet hook you used to make the granny squares or other pieces you want to join.

If you find it more comfortable to use another size perhaps slightly smaller, feel free, as long as you are easily able to achieve the same tension with the crochet hook you choose.

Either way, you're basically just working a slip stitch while holding two motifs together, working on the wrong side of the pieces to make a mostly invisible join. You can use single crochet stitch to join crocheted pieces together. This would be worked very similarly to the slip stitch join, connecting two motifs together using a familiar crochet stitch.

In this case, the seaming is going to be a bit bulkier and won't lie flat, which make sense since the single crochet stitch is obviously taller than the slip stitch.

This is a great joining method for times when you want to add detail through the joining. This example of joining crochet motifs was inspired by a love of rag quilts. It replicates the look of a rag quilt but is worked entirely in crochet. It is a highly textured method of joining and is something that you will probably want to use sparingly but it can be highly effective for certain projects. If you're looking for an unobtrusive, barely-there join for crocheted squares or pieces, this join is worth investigating.

It provides a method of joining that is almost seamless. This is perfect for joining elements of crocheted clothing, where you don't want your seams to show.

This is an attractively textured join that sort of resembles a crochet braid , hence the name of the technique. It's a lovely way to join granny squares. If you have created squares or panels with a heavily textured or aran-style look, this method would be especially appropriate for joining them. This tutorial from Moogly comes with video instructions. The join-as-you-go method is ideal for crocheters who do not want to deal with sewing a pile of squares or motifs together at the end of a project.

This method allows you to join your motifs together as you crochet them. There's a lot to absorb with this method; if you really want to understand the technique thoroughly, the best resource is Kristin Omdahl's book, Seamless Crochet. Whip Stitch Join. Slip Stitch Join. Single Crochet Join. Continue to 5 of 7 below. Reverse Mattress Stitch for Join. Flat Braid Join. Read More.

Diane 19 Apr Now could you please do a post on how to weave the ends in on granny squares so they stay put? I use this tail to attach the crochet squares to each other as I make them. More success stories All success stories Hide success stories. So here you go, 12 ways to join granny squares. This joining method will probably take me a lot longer than crocheting the pieces together would, […].

Piecing together granny squares

Piecing together granny squares. Primary Sidebar

And she is right again. You crochet the blocks together as if you are zipping them up. I have made the join with a contrasting colour to better illustrate how it works, but you can use the same colour as your squares and the seams will blend in effortlessly.

In the pictures above you can see that the slip stitches form a flat cable on the front of the blanket and a running stitch on the back. The 2 back loops will be right next to each other, so on the inside of the join. For the purposes of this tutorial I will call them the inside loops see adjacent photo. You will be working ONLY into the inside loops back loops. First you will need some squares. I am using my Iced Pie Squares for this tutorial.

Next you will need to place your squares side by side with the right side of both facing up Photo 2. Starting with the block to your left , insert your hook from front to back into the inside loop of the first stitch. Now insert your hook from front to back into the inside loop of the first stitch of the other square Photo 3.

If you are going to be adding new yarn to join your crochet squares, add it now by placing a slip knot on your hook as in Photo 4. I like starting with a slip knot. Pull through both of the stitches loops on your hook Photo 5.

Insert your hook from front to back into the inside loop of the next stitch of the square on your left see Photo 6. Then insert your hook from front to back into the inside loop of the next stitch of the other square Photo 7. Grab your yarn, which will be at the back of your work, and pull through all three loops on your hook Photo 8. Remember to keep your tension loose. Keep working a slip stitch into the inside loops of each stitch through both layers this until you have joined all the stitches down the side of your squares.

When you get to the end, bind off. Photo 9 below shows a different view of what it should look like when you have inserted your hook through both of the inside loops from front to back. Inserting your hook in this way will cause the two inside loops to lie on top of each other instead of side by side. This is what makes the seam so flat. Photo 10 illustrates the seam from the front. Photo 11 illustrates the seam from the back.

You can join these squares in a grid like Lucy from Attic24 does in her tutorial , but because you are working with the squares side by side and the yarn in the back, it becomes a bit fiddly. Lay the next two squares next to each other as before and continue slip stitching them together as instructed above. You can attach any number of squares in this fashion. The idea is that you join all the squares in one direction first and then join all the squares in the other direction.

The easier method by far is to join the crochet squares to each other in long strips, as if you were making a bunch of scarves. You can then join these strips to each other using the method above. I use this tail to attach the crochet squares to each other as I make them. If I left all the joining until the end, I would probably never complete a blanket. It is a round-up of 10 tutorials for joining granny squares.

It is both easy and very well explained. I hope you have found this tutorial useful. If you have any questions or feedback, shoot me a comment! At the end of the year we will be blocking and joining them so that we end up with a lovely blanket in time for Christmas.

I will be doing a photo tutorial with permission from the designers for each block apart from the first 4 , so even if you are a beginner, you should be able to follow along. You can read more about it and find the links to date here. Remember to subscribe to my newsletter if you would like to be kept in the loop.

Thank you for this tutorial. I used it to join the two halves of my Christmas baubles, it was a bit tricky at first but got easier on bauble number 2 already.

The join looks even, flat and works great for my purpose. Only 28 t go now! Thanks again, love your blog! It is quite a fiddly join, but once you get used to it it is quite meditative. Have you shared any photos of your baubles? Hi Jenn. But the zipper stitch will def work :.

My afghan squars keep coming apart with use. I attached them with a slip stitch because I knew if no other method. The only thing I can think of is that the yarn you used is disintegrating? This has never happened to me, so I am not sure how to help you. Lots of folks crochet tightly, so their chain stitches, for example, are tighter than the bigger stitches.

If this is the case, the slip stitch seam will be tighter than the fabric it is joining. Anyone who is already familiar with hand sewing will have an edge up when learning this method of joining crochet. Even without experience, though, this proves to be an easy technique that you can learn quickly.

The slip stitch join is a simple crocheted join. It is a great choice for people who do not want to have to implement sewing techniques into their crochet work since it is done with a crochet hook. As the name suggests, you are connecting two motifs together by attaching them using the slip stitch.

You can use the same crochet hook you used to make the granny squares or other pieces you want to join. If you find it more comfortable to use another size perhaps slightly smaller, feel free, as long as you are easily able to achieve the same tension with the crochet hook you choose. Either way, you're basically just working a slip stitch while holding two motifs together, working on the wrong side of the pieces to make a mostly invisible join.

You can use single crochet stitch to join crocheted pieces together. This would be worked very similarly to the slip stitch join, connecting two motifs together using a familiar crochet stitch. In this case, the seaming is going to be a bit bulkier and won't lie flat, which make sense since the single crochet stitch is obviously taller than the slip stitch.

This is a great joining method for times when you want to add detail through the joining. This example of joining crochet motifs was inspired by a love of rag quilts. It replicates the look of a rag quilt but is worked entirely in crochet. It is a highly textured method of joining and is something that you will probably want to use sparingly but it can be highly effective for certain projects.

If you're looking for an unobtrusive, barely-there join for crocheted squares or pieces, this join is worth investigating. It provides a method of joining that is almost seamless. This is perfect for joining elements of crocheted clothing, where you don't want your seams to show.

This is an attractively textured join that sort of resembles a crochet braid , hence the name of the technique.

How to Seam Granny Squares

In my previous pattern and tutorial of the Sunburst Granny Square Blanket , I have done some web searches to find out ways to join granny squares. There are so many methods and styles and I am glad to be able to find one to use for my blanket. Though I ended up using Flat Slip Stitch Method for my blanket, I would like to wrap-up my findings on ways to join granny squares which could be of interest to you.

So here you go, 12 ways to join granny squares. Out of the 12 ways, 8 of them are basic join methods and 4 are fancy methods. I have used 3 of the basic ways to join granny squares in my previous projects and I will definitely try out those fancy joints like the Celtic Lace and Flat Braid Join methods for my future granny square projects. Hope this wrap-up is able to help you to decide which method to use for your next granny square project. It leaves a ridge separating each square and gives the blanket texture and dimension.

Similar to the Single Crochet join method, but instead of single crochet, you do slip stitch crochet. It gives a flatter seamline. You can do the join to the front of the project, or to the back of the project, each will give you a different look. I used this method in my African Flower Purse. Instead of joining the outer loops of the squares, this flat slip-stitch method is working from the front of the squares and slip stitch the inner loops of the square.

It gives a nice flat seam that blocks the squares nicely. I used this method in my Sunburst Granny Square Blanket. The end result is the same as the crochet Slip Stitch Join Method above. The entry point of the needle is slightly different, it will show both loops of the square on the front side.

By doing a classic granny 3dc group stitch to join the granny squares give you near to joint-less seam, simply crochet the set of 3dc and a chain to the left and right squares to seam.

This method is good if you have already had a plan of which squares to join to each other. If you are making doily square or modified granny square that has a lacy look, this is could be the easiest join method to use. You just do chain 2 in between each slip stitch. In order to complement the pieces you are joining, you could also vary the number of chains and vary where you place the anchor stitches. If you are looking for non-conventional joining method that could add some dimensions to your granny square project, these few methods are could be your choice.

Add a few rounds of lace pattern to the basic granny square and join the last round to the adjacent square as you go. It is a join-as-you-go method too for the last round. Thank you so much for your instructions… Your zig-zag tutorial made my poncho possible. Might you be willing to share any advice on the best way to apply this method of joining in the bottom edge? There will be only one layer of fabric at this point.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. I really appreciate your willingness to share tutorials and patterns! Through your site I have found patterns that come very close to the ones I am seeking. Yours is one of the few sites I have subscribed to as my way of thanking you. Love your site…I am on here everyday trying to learn a new stitch! Thank you! I used your flat slip stitch join method. It was so easy and it looks great.

Happy to get the feedback from you. What a great collection! Your email address will not be published. It gives a flat yet clearly defined vertical and. This is the. Where did the name come from? Subscribe via email for latest updates:.

Follow Craft Passion's Network:. Excellent information on joining granny squares. I was looking for a new way to join squares, and I found it here!

Hi, Thank you so very much for sharing. Thank you for making this job easier and fun! Sincerely, Lynne. Love your cross stitch rainbow blocks, Tonya, they are lovely and colorful!!! How great are all those joins for the granny squares, looking forward to trying a few.

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Piecing together granny squares

Piecing together granny squares

Piecing together granny squares