Oral health abstract in head start-Promoting Oral Health in Head Start - Head Start

Methods: Thirteen Latina caregivers from a local Early Head Start program participated in an 8 h bilingual oral health training program that provided information and hands-on experiences pertaining to prenatal and children's oral health. Once trained, the 13 COHWs conducted a series of bilingual interactive oral health promotion workshops at local community sites. Bivariate analyses were used to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the COHWs and caregivers regarding children's oral health. Positive trends were observed for knowing that tap water with fluoride prevents cavities and that poor oral health of parents affects their children's dental health. Significant positive improvements were found regarding caregiver's favorable attitude that fluoridated water can help prevent cavities, disagreeing that tap water is dangerous, and agreeing that a parent's dental health affects their children's dental health.

Oral health abstract in head start

Oral health abstract in head start

Oral health abstract in head start

Every tip sheet also includes a simple recipe for a healthy snack. De Leon also says the community does not have enough knowledge about the importance of oral health care. The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided Kerry katona pussy original author s and the copyright owner s are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. They learned their role as promotoras in preventing oral disease in the community, addressing frequently encountered oral health problems, and promoting oral health in their community. All written material was kept at a 6th grade literacy level and was translated and back Oral health abstract in head start into Spanish.

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October Abstracf Oral Health Care This tip sheet talks about why heatlh is important to treat tooth decay in primary teeth and offers tips for Head Start staff to encourage parents to get follow-up care for their child. Oral Health. Suggestions include sharing information about the importance of oral health and helping Head Start staff identify and establish Kissing shots interacial dental home for pregnant women and children. OHRC American hangout native teen your feedback on this series, as well as your suggestions for topics for future tip sheets. The monthly Brush Up on Oral Health tip sheet provides Head Start staff with information on best and promising practices Orap oral health, current research, practical tips, frequently healyh questions, and recipes for healthy snacks. The electronic form is designed for oral health providers to enter information into specific fields in the form. March Dental Hygienist Liaisons This tip sheet describes the role of dental hygienist liaisons and how they can help staff promote oral health for pregnant women and children in Head Start programs. Sample provider letter. They are available in English and Spanish. September Oral Health, Overall Health, and Learning The issue discusses how Head Start programs can find and use the dental periodicity schedule for their state. For best results, download the forms to your computer and open them with Adobe Readerwhich is Orql at no Oral health abstract in head start.

Teaching children and parents about oral health throughout the program year is a valuable service that Head Start staff provide.

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  • The monthly Brush Up on Oral Health tip sheet provides Head Start staff with information on best and promising practices in oral health, current research, practical tips, frequently asked questions, and recipes for healthy snacks.
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Methods: Thirteen Latina caregivers from a local Early Head Start program participated in an 8 h bilingual oral health training program that provided information and hands-on experiences pertaining to prenatal and children's oral health. Once trained, the 13 COHWs conducted a series of bilingual interactive oral health promotion workshops at local community sites.

Bivariate analyses were used to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the COHWs and caregivers regarding children's oral health.

Positive trends were observed for knowing that tap water with fluoride prevents cavities and that poor oral health of parents affects their children's dental health. Significant positive improvements were found regarding caregiver's favorable attitude that fluoridated water can help prevent cavities, disagreeing that tap water is dangerous, and agreeing that a parent's dental health affects their children's dental health.

Conclusions: The study showed a targeted and culturally competent oral health program can significantly improve knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices of COHWs and the caregivers they trained. Although longitudinal studies are needed to determine if a COHW model can help reduce ECC in underserved communities, preliminary results support the utilization of this model as a viable option that should be expanded.

Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood infectious disease and continues to be a serious public health problem affecting both developing and industrialized countries, yet it is preventable 1 — 6. In the U. Children from disadvantaged populations and low socioeconomic status are at increased risk for developing ECC.

For example, among youth 2—19 years of age, total dental caries affects Hispanics Additionally, the proportion of children with untreated dental caries in their primary teeth increases with age: Left untreated, dental caries can lead to infections, pain and loss of teeth, affecting the child's quality of life by interfering with the ability to perform daily activities like eating, sleeping, learning, and playing 9 — From to , a decrease was seen in the prevalence of total dental caries from While numerous factors contribute to ECC diet, oral hygiene habits, oral bacteria, access to care, etc.

Although oral health education is not the only step in dental caries prevention, it is a critical and important factor, especially among vulnerable populations who experience less access to oral health care services 9 , Thus, dentistry's success in meeting the challenges of an increasingly ethnically diverse population is dependent upon considering the larger social and cultural context in order to have an impact on personal behavior change 9 , 16 — Community Health Workers CHW play a vital role in connecting marginalized and medically underserved populations to the health and social service systems intended to serve them 19 — CHWs i.

CHW's understand the cultural perspectives of the communities they serve and can help reduce barriers to health care and increase access to preventive oral health services 16 , Promotoras have been used extensively to reach diverse populations such as mothers and infants, migrant farm workers, and Latino populations.

Adams et al. Four of the five reported tooth brushing behaviors improved between pretest and post-test, especially brushing at night Thus, the CHW promotora model is a promising method for improving oral health-related knowledge and behavior among underserved and underinsured minority communities 9 , 31 — The trained COHWs then conducted oral health workshops in the community for other caregivers of young children.

After completion of the oral health training, the COHWs conducted oral health workshops in the community for other caregivers of young children. The Policy Council is a group of EHS parents who are selected by their peers to help advise the Head Start director and governing board on important matters related to the center.

These caregivers have already shown leadership potential that could be further developed by their participation in this project. Phase I : Formative research and oral health curriculum development,. Figure 1 presents the project timeline and overview. All caregivers with children between the ages of 0—5 were eligible to participate in the focus group. The focus group lasted 90 min and was guided by open-ended questions on tooth brushing habits, toothpaste usage, fluoridated water usage, dental visits, dental insurance, and barriers to dental care.

Notes were taken during the focus group and specific quotes were documented and highlighted. After the focus group, the notes were fully transcribed. Notes and open-ended questions were examined for themes using content analysis. The focus group was not audio-recorded. Review of basic oral anatomy and characteristics of healthy vs.

Teaching COHWs how to identify differences between normal and abnormal findings in the mouth e. Creating awareness of pregnancy and child preventive oral health practices known to reduce ECC morning sickness, tooth brushing, flossing, snacking, fluoride, etc.

Creating awareness of particular challenges involved in dealing with special needs children such as autistic children e. How to perform a regular and thorough basic oral screening of infants and children.

The curriculum was kept at a 6th grade literacy level and all written materials were translated and back translated into Spanish. The COHW training consisted of 4 consecutive weekly 2 h sessions which included a combination of classroom lectures, hands-on training, and discussions. Total in-person training time was 8 h; an additional 4—5 h for reading assigned homework materials and listening to webinars was required. The training introduced COHWs to evidence-based health knowledge about the nature, prevalence, and consequences of oral manifestations of chronic oral diseases across the lifespan with an emphasis on children as well as the oral-systemic connection.

The COHWs learned how to assess a child's oral health, identify basic healthy vs. They performed basic oral health screenings on their own children and children of their peers.

They learned their role as promotoras in preventing oral disease in the community, addressing frequently encountered oral health problems, and promoting oral health in their community. Reflection sessions allowed the COHWs and the project team to exchange ideas and thoughts.

The COHWs were required to review a list of course materials prior to the start of some of the trainings. Training sessions were presented simultaneously in English and Spanish by the pediatric dental resident and two nurse practitioner students. The pediatric dental resident conducted sessions 1, 3, and 4 and the two nursing practitioner students conducted session 2.

Childcare and light refreshments were available at all training meetings. Table 1 provides a brief description of the topics covered during the 4 training sessions:. The 13 COHWs who completed the training conducted 15 1 h bilingual oral health promotion workshops in teams of two to a convenience sample of caregivers of young children in the local community. These 1 h bilingual oral health workshops were conducted at local elementary schools, parks, homes, and WIC sites.

A UCLA team member was present to assist and help collect data. The bilingual pediatric dentist attended most workshops, offering support.

Workshop locations, dates, and times were selected by the COHWs who made all the necessary arrangements flyers, number of anticipated attendees, etc. UCLA provided free oral hygiene supplies, small raffle gifts, and light refreshments at all workshops. The curriculum used for these workshops was a condensed version of the curriculum used for the COHW training.

All written material was kept at a 6th grade literacy level and was translated and back translated into Spanish. The learning objectives for the 1 h oral health workshops conducted by the COHWs are listed below:. To understand the importance of perinatal oral health care, including vertical transmission. To be able to list the negative impacts of ECC. To identify the early signs of caries. To understand how to prevent ECC through the use of fluoride, dental home by age 1, proper oral hygiene, and appropriate nutrition.

To identify the benefits of fluoridated tap water. To demonstrate the proper brushing and flossing techniques. The 13 COHWs who participated in the training completed a item written paper and pencil pre- and post-test questionnaire available in English and Spanish to assess changes in knowledge, beliefs, and practices regarding children's oral health see Supplementary Datasheet 1 for the COHW questionnaire. Fourteen items were related to oral health knowledge, 10 addressed the COHWs beliefs toward children's oral health, and 10 related to oral health practices.

The pre-test was completed by the COHWs at the beginning of the first training session. The post-test was completed 6 weeks after the training ended. Caregivers participating in the workshops completed a written paper and pencil pre- and post-test questionnaire it took between 8 and 10 min to fill it out to assess changes in knowledge and beliefs regarding children's oral health. Pre-test questionnaires were filled out at the beginning of each workshop and the post-tests were completed immediately following.

The questionnaire contained 16 items on the pre-test and 11 items on the post-test see Supplementary Datasheet 2, 3 for the caregiver questionnaire. Pre- and post-test responses were matched. Eight items related to oral health knowledge, three addressed beliefs about children's oral health, and five were related to oral health practices. Oral health practices were only addressed on the pretest as changes in practice would not be measureable following a 1 h workshop.

Paired t -tests and McNemar tests were used to assess changes in knowledge, beliefs, and practices between pre- and post-test results for the COHW and changes in knowledge and beliefs for workshop attendees. Below is a summary of the findings along with representative quotes for each topic area.

Common tooth brushing habits among children included brushing in the morning and evening and brushing after their child eats candy. The two biggest factors affecting tooth brushing were bad taste of toothpaste and children being scared of the toothbrush.

Singing and playing music were reported as strategies for calming children down so parents could brush their teeth. She also brushes at night time. Focus group participants described cavities as being black stains, spots, or holes. The most common responses regarding causes of cavities were drinking milk especially during night if a child sleeps with a bottle , mother giving cavities to their child, and not brushing your child's teeth consistently.

Most participants knew that cavities in baby teeth could affect adult teeth. If cavities were not treated early enough, participants were aware that children could become toothless or get sick. When asked what to do if a young child's tooth hurts or is knocked out, responses included: take them to the emergency room if it happens at night, place something cold on the area, and place the tooth in a glass of milk and take it to the emergency room.

The germs in mouth at night can form cavities. They will check with radiographs to start treating cavities early. It is important to not miss these appointments because if we miss them because we get lazy, we can be harming our child. Most participants reported drinking filtered or bottled water. Some were concerned that bottled water was not good because it did not have fluoride while others were concerned about drinking water that had too much fluoride.

Most did not know whether their drinking water had fluoride. Most participants wanted dentists to provide them with more information about what was going to happen to their child during the dental visit. They also wanted the dentist to speak with the child to explain what would be happening to them during the visit.

A few participants thought receptionists at dental clinics should be nicer to patients and more knowledgeable about insurance coverage.

A recipe for a healthy snack that can be made in the Head Start classroom or at home is also included. August Age 1 Dental Visit In this issue, learn why age 1 dental visits are important. It also provides tips Head Start staff can use to promote oral health during home visits. Learn about proper toothbrushing and other preventive measures and how to find a dentist. October Follow-up Oral Health Care This tip sheet talks about why it is important to treat tooth decay in primary teeth and offers tips for Head Start staff to encourage parents to get follow-up care for their child.

Oral health abstract in head start

Oral health abstract in head start

Oral health abstract in head start

Oral health abstract in head start

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Teaching children and parents about oral health throughout the program year is a valuable service that Head Start staff provide. Repeating messages reminds children and parents about the importance of keeping their mouth healthy and reinforces how to do it. Children learn best when short and simple messages are repeated regularly using various learning methods for example, see-tell-do. Here are some examples:. The oral health webpage maintained by the National Center on Early Childhood Health and Wellness also has many resources.

June Get Started Today! Facebook Twitter YouTube. Strategies Head Start Staff Can Use to Promote Oral Health Children learn best when short and simple messages are repeated regularly using various learning methods for example, see-tell-do.

Here are some examples: Use teaching practices that engage children. Teaching practices that engage children promote thinking and language development. Engaging children in conversation can help them learn new words, think critically, and answer clearly. Some questions that promote thinking and talking about oral health include: How do you brush your teeth? Why do you brush your teeth? What else can you do to keep your mouth and teeth healthy?

Tell me about your last visit to the dentist. Integrate oral health into activities. In addition to daily tooth brushing, Head Start staff can include oral health in math, science, reading, and art activities. Helping children learn words by having them match oral-health-related pictures, like teeth, toothpaste, and a smile.

Teaching children to count and learn colors using toothbrushes. Reading books with positive oral health messages to children.

Having children pretend they are visiting a dental office. Singing songs about oral health. Engage parents in promoting oral health at home. Ideas include: Working with parents to find the best ways to position their child for tooth brushing.

Remind parents that young children cannot brush their teeth well until age seven to eight. Asking parents to take photographs of their child brushing his teeth and helping the child write stories about his experience. Helping parents choose and prepare foods that promote good oral health. Encouraging parents to ask their child what she learned about oral health in Head Start that day. Offering parents suggestions for at-home activities that support what children are learning about oral health in Head Start.

Participate in or create oral health campaigns and programs. And many state health departments sponsor campaigns with resources available to the public.

Head Start staff can use materials from these and other sources in classrooms and during socializations, home visits, parent meetings, and other events to stress the importance of oral health.

Oral health abstract in head start