Mixing breast milk and formula-Mixing Milk | La Leche League International

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. It can take several weeks for you and your baby to feel happy and confident with breastfeeding. Once you've both got the hang of it, it's usually possible to offer your baby bottles of expressed milk or formula alongside breastfeeding. Introducing formula feeds can affect the amount of breast milk you produce. There is also a small amount of evidence to show babies may not breastfeed as well because they learn to use a different kind of sucking action at the bottle than at the breast.

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Updated: October 25, Breastfeeding is one of those things where the best-laid plans often don't pan out. Make sure to keep it cold after you mix it since formula is only good out of the fridge for an hour. Thanks for adding your feedback. Also, you only have to make one bottle. Thank you. These include: Issues with breastfeeding Sometimes breastfeeding can be difficult for the mother or baby. Comments Hello, I stopped feeding my son breast milk and began giving him hypoallergenic formula since he was 2 months old.

Lesbion recrutes. Where can I get help?

Pin FB ellipsis More. Bottle-feeding and breastfeeding. Please note: in order to prevent spam and inappropriate language, all comments are moderated before they appear. Riordan, J. Place the bottle in a bottle warmer or cup of hot water to heat it. I saw one when my little one was 5 days old and it helped tremendously. Rub the soap over all surfaces of your hands and fingers for 20 seconds. This is most common among moms who have multiples, those Mixing breast milk and formula have had breast-reduction surgery, and possibly women who give birth later in life. Getting Enough Milk? Offer your baby breastmilk alone first to avoid wasting any.

Introducing some formula to your baby's diet may actually help you keep nursing longer.

  • Introducing some formula to your baby's diet may actually help you keep nursing longer.
  • Some parents choose to mix feed their babies, alternating between breastfeeding and formula feeding due to work commitments or for other reasons.
  • Combination feeding baby.

Breastfeeding moms supplement their children with infant formula for many reasons. If you do decide to supplement with formula, there are a few things you should consider before you mix formula with breast milk. Mixing the two is possible, even in the same bottle, but you need to be careful to follow the mixing instructions before combining formula with breast milk. Improper mixing can lead to an over-concentration of nutrients that may pose a danger to your baby.

There are many reasons why parents may choose to mix breast milk with formula. Whatever the reason may be, if you decide to give your child breast milk and formula, there may be times when the two need to be combined in the same bottle. Infant formula is made to provide your baby with a specific amount of calories and nutrients in a specific volume of fluid. For example, a standard formula is 20 calories per fluid ounce. So, if you prepare the formula as directed, your baby gets the expected amount.

However, if you add powdered formula or concentrated liquid formula directly into your breast milk before you dilute it with water, it changes the balance of nutrients and water in both your breast milk and the infant formula. When your baby is an infant, his kidneys are not yet mature. The kidneys of newborns and young infants need enough water to process all of the nutrients in their feedings, especially the proteins and the salts. When feeding is too concentrated, it can be dangerous and just too much for your baby's little body to handle.

Therefore, when preparing your child's formula, you should always use the correct amount of water and follow all the instructions that you are given. When you buy formula for your baby, you will usually get one of these three types: concentrated liquid, powdered, or ready-to-feed. If you use concentrated liquid formula or powdered infant formula, be sure to make it according to the manufacturer's instructions or any alternate instructions that your baby's doctor gives you.

Mix the formula first, separate from the breast milk. Concentrated and powdered infant formulas are typically diluted with sterile water or safe drinking water that has been boiled for five minutes and then cooled.

Talk to your child's doctor to find out if tap water is a safe alternative. Once the concentrated liquid or powdered formula is prepared, it can then be added to a bottle of breast milk or given after the bottle of breast milk. You should NEVER add undiluted powdered infant formula or concentrated liquid formula directly into your breast milk, and you should NEVER use your breast milk in place of water to mix concentrated or powdered infant formula.

If you have any questions or concerns about how to dilute or mix your baby's formula correctly, call your baby's doctor. In contrast, if you decide to add your breast milk into a bottle of ready-to-feed formula , that is OK. This type of formula does not pose the same concerns as those that need to be prepared. While it is OK to mix your breast milk with an already prepared infant formula in the same bottle, there are some good reasons to offer each one at a time if possible that are worth considering as well.

Breastfeeding is one of those things where the best-laid plans often don't pan out. Whether you breastfeed, formula feed, or use a combination of the two and whether or not where you end up is where you intended to be when you started , remember that making sure your baby is getting adequate nutrition is all that matters. As you find your way, just make sure that you do so safely. Get it free when you sign up for our newsletter. Kids Health. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infant Formula Preparation and Storage.

World Health Organization. Ballard O, Morrow AL. Human milk composition: nutrients and bioactive factors. Pediatr Clin North Am. More in Babies. Low milk supply: Some moms may struggle to make enough breast milk to breastfeed exclusively. Supplementing with formula ensures that your baby gets the nutrition he needs while still getting some breast milk. Extra sleep: Feeding pumped breast milk and formula is one way to allow the mother to get some extra sleep.

This way, the other parent can take a turn feeding the baby in the night, giving the mother a chance to rest. Returning to work: Many others choose a combination of breast milk feeding and formula feeding for convenience when they return to work. Concentrated Liquid and Powdered Infant Formula. Ready-to-Feed Formula. You don't want to waste your breast milk: If you offer your breast milk first, your baby will get all of it perhaps later rejecting a little bit of formula because she's too full , ensuring you don't waste the little bit of milk you have to provide.

Your baby will get all the benefits of breast milk: Since breast milk contains more nutritional and health properties than formula, it is best if your baby gets all of the breast milk that's available.

A Word From Verywell. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Sign Up. What are your concerns? Article Sources. Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine Protocol Committee. ABM clinical protocol 3: hospital guidelines for the use of supplementary feedings in the healthy term breastfed neonate, revised Lawrence, Ruth A. Elsevier Health Sciences. Perry, Shannon E. Maternal Child Nursing Care. Riordan, J. Breastfeeding and Human Lactation Fourth Edition.

Jones and Bartlett Learning. Continue Reading. The Different Formulas Recommended for Preemies. Overview of the Lipids in Breast Milk. How to Prepare Ready to Feed Formula. How to Combine Breast and Formula Feeding. The 7 Best Baby Formulas of Exclusive Pumping, Formula, and Bottle Feeding. The Mature Stage of Breast Milk.

Co-Authored By:. Kelly is also passionate about travel, tea, travel, and animal rights and welfare. As you initiate bottle-feeding, begin with the smallest nipple size, since a slow-flow one most closely mimics your own body. You don't want to waste your breast milk: If you offer your breast milk first, your baby will get all of it perhaps later rejecting a little bit of formula because she's too full , ensuring you don't waste the little bit of milk you have to provide. She may recommend that you pump your breasts in addition to breastfeeding to increase your supply and that you top off the meal with some extra pumped milk or give your child a supplement of formula for a short period of time. If the formula is pre-made, then you can mix the liquid with breastmilk as is. Close View image.

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula. Quick Links

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How to combine breast and bottle feeding - NHS

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. It can take several weeks for you and your baby to feel happy and confident with breastfeeding. Once you've both got the hang of it, it's usually possible to offer your baby bottles of expressed milk or formula alongside breastfeeding. Introducing formula feeds can affect the amount of breast milk you produce. There is also a small amount of evidence to show babies may not breastfeed as well because they learn to use a different kind of sucking action at the bottle than at the breast.

These things can make breastfeeding more difficult, especially in the first few weeks when you and your baby are still getting comfortable with breastfeeding. Your breastmilk supply will usually not be affected if you start bottle feeding your baby when they are a bit older, you are both comfortable with breastbeeding, and you breastfeed every day.

If you're combining breastfeeding with formula feeds both you and your baby can carry on enjoying the benefits of breastfeeding. It may take a while for a breastfed baby to get the hang of bottle feeding, because they need to use a different sucking action. See more advice on how to bottle feed. See more tips on boosting your milk supply. Page last reviewed: 8 October Next review due: 8 October How to combine breast and bottle feeding - Your pregnancy and baby guide Secondary navigation Getting pregnant Secrets to success Healthy diet Planning: things to think about Foods to avoid Alcohol Keep to a healthy weight Vitamins and supplements Exercise.

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Giving your baby their first bottle It may take a while for a breastfed baby to get the hang of bottle feeding, because they need to use a different sucking action. These tips may help too: Hold and cuddle your baby as much as possible , ideally skin to skin.

Express your breast milk regularly. About 8 times a day, including once at night is ideal. It may be easier to express by hand to begin with — your midwife, health visitor or breastfeeding supporter can show you how. Try bottlefeeding while holding your baby skin to skin and close to your breasts. If your baby is latching on, feed little and often. See tips on how to get your baby properly positioned and attached. Decrease the number of bottles gradually , as your milk supply increases.

Consider using a lactation aid supplementer. A tiny tube is taped next to your nipple and passes into your baby's mouth so your baby can get milk via the tube as well as from your breast. This helps to support your baby as they get used to attaching to the breast.

Your midwife, health visitor or breastfeeding supporter can give you more information. Help and support with mixed feeding If you have any questions or concerns about combining breast and bottle feeding: talk to your midwife, health visitor or breastfeeding supporter call the National Breastfeeding Helpline on 9.

Media last reviewed: 22 February Media review due: 22 March

Mixing breast milk and formula

Mixing breast milk and formula