Breastfeeding a newborn-Breastfeeding your newborn | What to expect the first week | Medela

This information is for mothers with babies born at full term or close to full term and addresses the normal course of breastfeeding. The guidelines offered here may not be appropriate for a baby born prematurely or who is in NICU, or for parents with other unusual circumstances, such as circumstances faced by adoptive parents. If you and your baby have unusual circumstances, we encourage you to talk with your health care team candidly about the importance feeding your baby your own milk holds for you and engage their support in finding ways to succeed in achieving your goals. Please also see our information on nursing a premature baby , adoptive nursing , or information that fits your circumstances more closely than this one. Finally, please contact a Leader near you to ask any other questions you may have; Leaders are always happy to share the information they have and find more information when needed to help every person achieve success in nursing their baby to the fullest extent possible.

You should feed your baby throughout the day and w. Share this content. Breastfeeding a newborn feeding should be at your breast in the early weeks. Infant sleep and night feeding patterns during later infancy: Association with breastfeeding frequency, daytime complementary food intake, and infant weight. Mature milk: Arriving between day 10 and two weeks postpartum, mature milk is thin and white and sometimes slightly bluish. Healthy newborns have their first growth spurt between 1 and 3 weeks. Growth spurts make babies fussier, so your baby will want to eat more often, Breastfeeding a newborn once every hour. But one of the most super things you can do neaborn week is just be with your baby and get breastfeeding on track.

Dildo male. Feeding Patterns

Remember — Breastreeding are so tiny! These can happen at any time, but in the early months growth Tiny teens toon often occur at around:. But one of the most super things you can do this week x just be with your baby and get breastfeeding on track. But with some trial-and-error, you might find another breastfeeding position works better for you and your baby. Football hold: Your baby's legs are tucked under your arm on the Breastfeeeding side as the breast you're nursing from. Be sure to signup for an online breastfeeding class. As your milk comes in and your baby Breastfeeding a newborn established good latch-on, you can try burping as often as you think helps your baby. Loose and watery. Nipple care for breastfeeding mums. Tickle baby's lip with your nipple to encourage baby to open very wide, like a yawn. Here are some reliable Berastfeeding you can call on:. Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. Breastfeeding frequency and duration can vary a lot in the first week. Read about the next step of your breastfeeding journey in Breastfeeding the first month: What to expect. These are all common questions that most breastfeeding moms will encounter during Breastfeeding a newborn first few weeks — and they are totally normal.

Without skipping a beat of conversation or a bite of lunch, they open a button and latch on a baby, as if breastfeeding were the most natural process in the world.

  • Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement.
  • Posts on Clarks Condensed contain affiliate links, which I earn a small commission from.
  • Without skipping a beat of conversation or a bite of lunch, they open a button and latch on a baby, as if breastfeeding were the most natural process in the world.
  • Whether you're a new mom or a seasoned parenting pro, breastfeeding often comes with its fair share of questions.
  • Read our breastfeeding advice to help you get off to the best possible start.

Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least 10 — 12 times per day 24 hours. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first—wake baby to nurse if 2 hours during the day or 4 hours at night have passed without nursing. Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week.

Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life 1 on day one, 2 on day two…. After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least stools daily that are the size of a US quarter 2. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often—this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose soft to runny and may be seedy or curdy.

Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life 1 on day one, 2 on day two…. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons 45 mL of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again.

Frequent nursing in the early weeks is important for establishing a good milk supply. Some newborns are excessively sleepy —wake baby to nurse if 2 hours during the day or 4 hours at night have passed without nursing.

The normal stool of a breastfed baby is yellow and loose soft to runny and may be seedy or curdy. After 4 — 6 weeks, some babies stool less frequently, with stools as infrequent as one every days. As long as baby is gaining well , this is normal. Some moms worry about milk supply. Between weight checks, a sufficient number of wet and dirty diapers will indicate that baby is getting enough milk. This information is also found as part of the professional Breastfeeding Logs. Breastfeeding Logs.

Hunger Cues — When do I feed baby? Breastfeeding Basics. Tips for juggling a newborn and toddler. How does milk production work? Is your milk supply really low? My breasts feel empty! Has my milk supply decreased? How can I find help for my breastfeeding problem? The Importance of Colostrum by Paula Yount. What is Normal? Can I Breastfeed if…? Facebook Pinterest Twitter.

How long babies nurse also depends on their age. You may need to temporarily increase the frequency of feedings. Sudden drop in supply. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons 45 mL of water into a clean diaper. View Sources. You count the length between feedings from the time when your baby begins to nurse — rather than when he or she ends — to when your little one starts nursing again. Hunger Cues — When do I feed baby?

Breastfeeding a newborn. When should I start breastfeeding my newborn?

This educational content is not medical or diagnostic advice. Use of this site is subject to our terms of use and privacy policy. Getting Pregnant. First Year. Baby Products. Reviewed December 8, How to get started, how to get comfortable and how to make sure the baby is getting enough to eat when breastfeeding. In This Article. Breastfeeding To raise your breastfeeding IQ before you start nursing, take this mini-course in breastfeeding basics.

When your milk comes in Breast milk arrives in three stages. This vital blend of proteins, vitamins and minerals can also help defend against harmful bacteria and viruses, and possibly even stimulate baby to produce antibodies.

Regularly suckling from the start will help stimulate your body to produce the next stage of milk within a few days. Transitional milk: Next on the tasting menu is transitional milk, which your breasts serve up between colostrum and mature milk.

Mature milk: Arriving between day 10 and two weeks postpartum, mature milk is thin and white and sometimes slightly bluish. Latching baby onto your breast In the beginning, it might take quite a few tries to get your baby into the right position — but keep trying.

Her head should be in line with the rest of her body, not turned, to make swallowing easier. Tickle baby's lip with your nipple to encourage baby to open very wide, like a yawn. If your baby turns away , gently stroke the cheek on the side nearest you. The rooting reflex will make baby turn her head toward your breast. Bring baby forward toward your breast once her mouth is open wide. Keep a hold of your breast until baby has a firm grasp and is suckling well.

Watch for suckling that is, extracting colostrum or breast milk from your breast , not just sucking gumming your nipple. Once your milk comes in, listen for the sound of swallowing or gulping. Sessions typically last 20 to 30 minutes. Your baby could take more or less time and need to feed for longer in the beginning and during growth spurts. Drain one breast fully. End the feeding by waiting for baby to let go of the nipple.

Often, your baby will fall asleep at the end of the first breast and either awaken to nurse from the second or sleep through until the next feeding. She might be tiny but she'll make her needs known by: Nuzzling against your breasts Sucking furiously on that little baby hand or your shirt, or your arm Opening her mouth Rooting reflex baby opens her mouth and turns her head to the side with her mouth open to find the food source, often after her cheek is stroked Sucking on her lip or tongue which can look like she's sticking her tongue out Making lip-smacking sounds If she does cry, it will typically be a short, low-pitched well that rises and falls Breastfeeding positions Your hospital will likely teach you the basic cradle hold.

Here's the lowdown on all the basic breastfeeding positions: Cradle hold: Position your baby so that her head rests in the bend of your elbow of the arm on the side you'll be breastfeeding, with the same hand supporting the rest of baby's body.

Hold your breast with your opposite hand and compress it very gently so that the nipple points toward baby's nose. Using your free hand, cup your breast as you would for the cradle hold. Football hold: Your baby's legs are tucked under your arm on the same side as the breast you're nursing from. Hold your baby with that arm on a pillow to lift him or her up , and use your other hand to cup your breast. Lie on your side with a pillow under your head.

Baby should face you, head in line with your nipple. In this position, you lean back comfortably on a couch or bed with pillows supporting your upper back, neck and head. Your little one's weight will be supported by your reclining body. The idea with this nursing position is to take advantage of gravity and naturally let baby seek out your nipple, but you can also hold your breast and point it toward baby to encourage latching.

This is a great breastfeeding position for newborns, babies who spit up a lot, and infants who are gassy or have ultra-sensitive stomachs. It also leaves your hands freer to cuddle with and caress your little cutie. Breastfeeding Essentials to Have Nearby How to tell if your baby is getting enough milk Many new nursing mothers worry at some point that baby isn't eating enough. If your little one seems happy and content after most feedings, then chances are she's a satisfied customer and is getting enough milk.

Dirty diapers. Keep a careful count: Your newborn should be pumping out eight to 12 with clear to very pale yellow urine and at least five soft, yellow bowel movements over a hour period in the beginning.

Are they eating enough? Are they eating too much? Do I have enough milk? These are all common questions that most breastfeeding moms will encounter during those first few weeks — and they are totally normal. However, I think many new moms lack the support they need — especially during those first few weeks…and they might feel alone as they learn how to breastfeed.

However, there are a few things I think you can do to make your breastfeeding journey start out on the right foot. Breastfeeding a newborn is a whole different story over breastfeeding a one-year-old. So if you are about to have a baby — or your baby has just arrived — I hope that these tips will help!

Make sure you read our Breastfeeding FAQ page for even more support! Ah, latch. A poor latch can cause nipple pain, poor milk transfer, etc. So how do you get the perfect latch? Well, you want to make sure baby opens their mouth as WIDE as possible. This is one of the best videos out there on how to achieve a deep latch. Skin to skin is SO important! If possible, do skin to skin with your baby as soon after birth as you can.

And that is okay. I would just recommend doing skin to skin when you can, and as frequently as you can. Labor and Delivery gowns that you can buy actually can be great for skin to skin! You should definitely watch some videos of the newborn baby crawl. There are other subtle hints they will give you to indicate they are hungry. Remember — they are so tiny! The amount a breastfed baby increases daily from the day they are born, as their stomach grows substantially during that day.

And then at that point, it slowly decreases until the age of one breast milk or formula should be the primary source of nutrition until the age of one. From one to six months, baby needs ounces of breast milk a day. This does not increase with age or size see Kelly Mom for more details. The first six weeks is absolutely crucial to establishing milk supply. By not watching the clock and allowing the baby to nurse whenever he or she wants as a newborn is setting you up for a more successful breastfeeding relationship.

I often say the best thing you can do is just to stop looking at the clock. We let Oliver sleep during the day past this mark, and I think it caused some of our problems in the beginning such as a nasty case of mastitis. After they reach that point, you can usually let them sleep a bit longer, so long as the weight gain continues to be good.

Sometimes a baby will want to each from each side multiple times, and that is okay, too. When I had Jack, the only position I could get to work right in the hospital was the football hold…which I did not love! All I wanted to do was to be able to cradle him while he nursed! However, there are a lot of different positions you can try. When Oliver was smaller, I often had to do the football position to even get him to stay latched.

The Mayo Clinic has this great slideshow that goes over all the different types of positions. So — how do you know if your newborn is getting enough? There are two things you should look at:. It is common to have sore nipples during the first weeks of breastfeeding. Your nipples have likely never had that kind of stimulation before, and it does take time for them to get used to it. I recommend having something kind of nipple cream — I personally like the Earth Mama Angel Baby brand.

However, my very favorite option was coconut oil. It seemed to work so much better than any other kind of nipple cream. Are you having pain beyond some initial soreness? Then it might be worth looking into. The 1 cause of pain with breastfeeding is due to a poor or insufficient latch.

Often, this can be combatted with the deep latching technique I mentioned above.

Breastfeeding: Basics and Tips for Nursing Your Baby

This information is for mothers with babies born at full term or close to full term and addresses the normal course of breastfeeding. The guidelines offered here may not be appropriate for a baby born prematurely or who is in NICU, or for parents with other unusual circumstances, such as circumstances faced by adoptive parents.

If you and your baby have unusual circumstances, we encourage you to talk with your health care team candidly about the importance feeding your baby your own milk holds for you and engage their support in finding ways to succeed in achieving your goals.

Please also see our information on nursing a premature baby , adoptive nursing , or information that fits your circumstances more closely than this one. Finally, please contact a Leader near you to ask any other questions you may have; Leaders are always happy to share the information they have and find more information when needed to help every person achieve success in nursing their baby to the fullest extent possible. Breastfeeding should be initiated within the first hour after birth whenever possible.

Place your baby in skin-to-skin contact with yourself, i. Skin-to-skin allows your baby to maintain appropriate body temperature and to begin to seek your breast. Read our skin-to-skin article here. Under conditions of minimal medical intervention, newborns who nurse eight or more times in the first 24 hours and who do not receive any supplements will urinate pee an average of about three times and stool poop an average of about three to four times in the first 24 hours.

Typically, you want to see at least one to two wet diapers and stools in the first 24 hours; [iii] , 4 they show nursing is getting off to a good start. The small amounts your baby gets at first make it easy for your baby learn to safely coordinate swallowing and breathing with suckling. Thus, it aids in removing the excess bilirubin resulting from excess red blood cells that can contribute to jaundice. Hence, colostrum is an important first step to preventing jaundice.

Colostrum contains more protein but less sugar glucose and fat than mature milk. Finally, these early feedings help stimulate your body to begin the second stage of lactogenesis—to begin producing milk. Over the next several days to two weeks, the colostrum will gradually transition to milk.

Milk production is primarily a supply-demand situation in the early postpartum period: the more milk your baby takes from you, the more milk your body makes shortly afterwards, as the removal of milk tells your body to make more. If you aim to nurse every hour and a-half to two hours during the day and no less than every three hours at night, you will easily achieve the frequency that will help you establish your milk supply and ensure your baby gets enough to help stimulate weight gain.

In fact, with frequent and effective nursing during the first week, milk production increases ten to nearly twenty times! There are multiple possible causes of jaundice. However, the most common form is normal, physiological jaundice, which is usually a temporary condition resulting from the breakdown of the extra red blood cells the baby needed in utero to support oxygen transport.

Then, because the milk will stimulate your baby to stool, many red blood cells and much of the bilirubin will be eliminated when your baby passes the meconium [xi] and, after the meconium is out of her system, when she poops. Inadequate breastfeeding can [xii] , and the best first treatment is increasing the frequency of nursing. The two factors most commonly associated with jaundice levels requiring treatment are not nursing frequently enough and ineffective milk transfer.

It is not necessary to stop breastfeeding to do phototherapy. By continuing to nurse your baby, you will ensure that he is getting plenty of the unique food designed for his optimal growth and development as well as for helping him eliminate the excess bilirubin. There may also be other causes of jaundice, though these are not common.

Giving your baby bottles of water or IV fluids will not have much effect on the bilirubin level, 5 as bilirubin is not passed through urine but through stools. Scheduling feedings for a baby who is exclusively nursing frequently throughout the day and night, especially during the first six weeks has been correlated with slow weight gain.

When someone postpones nursing to follow a feeding schedule, they may then experience engorgement, which tells their body to stop producing milk. These decreases in turn may lead to supplementation and then weaning. Many babies are very sleepy in the first 24 to 48 hours after birth. While some medical personnel believe that it is important to wake babies often to feed during their first two days of life, more recent research suggests that awakening them to feed more often may actually result in greater weight loss.

Babies tend to become more alert over the first few days after birth, especially after the first 24 to 48 hours.

The first few days are an important time to watch your baby and learn to read his or her feeding cues: the signals your baby will give to let you know they are getting hungry before they become deeply distressed.

Crying is a late feeding cue and indicates your baby is too hungry. By responding to the early feeding cues, you will find it easier to nurse your baby, as the more upset they become, the harder it can be to get them to calm down enough to latch on. Feeding cues begin subtly and become increasingly obvious as the baby grows hungrier and more distressed. So some babies may nurse for 45 minutes and then want to nurse again only 45 minutes after you put them down.

Here are the signals of becoming hungry that babies give:. After the first week, babies continue to need to nurse when they show signs of hunger. Their caloric needs will continue to increase. Over the next month to six weeks and under normal circumstances, full milk production is being established.

Research shows that the amount of milk babies can take in rises most during the first three weeks of their lives. There will be times when your baby seems to want to nurse more often; this is very normal. By the time your baby is two-to-three weeks old, she or he will be taking 2 to 3 ounces of milk per feeding and eating about 15 to 25 ounces of milk daily.

By the end of the first month, your baby will be taking in an average of 25 to 35 ounces of milk per day, though some babies take less and some babies take more, and both can be within the normal range. Note that this includes night nursings—recent research has shown that in the early weeks and months, many babies nurse most frequently between 9 p.

In a hour period, a baby between one and six months of age takes in about ounces per feeding; the amount will vary by the time of day. Every baby is different, and every mother is different.

Some mothers have larger storage capacities than others, so one baby may get more milk in one nursing session than another; that may mean a longer time between nursing sessions.

Exclusively breastfed infants—which means your baby is receiving nothing but your milk, not even water—tend to nurse about 8 times a day, with a range from 4 to 13 sessions per day. Every baby is different, and every baby changes as they grow.

Remember, nursing your baby offers your baby food, water, and you—all three are very important to your baby. Sometimes he may be hungry, other times she may be thirsty, and all of the time he or she will need closeness with you. Nursing a baby is as much about fulfilling that need for closeness as it is about feeding. It is a process in which physical, biochemical, hormonal, and psychosocial exchange takes place. Yes, night-nursing can be very important to help build your milk supply, establish the breastfeeding relationship, and help your baby begin to gain properly.

Feeding is only one reason young babies awaken at night. Digestion of human milk takes only about 1. As noted in another portion of this FAQ, research has shown that in the early weeks and months, many babies nurse most frequently between 9 p. The research shows that feeding formula makes no difference to night-waking; similarly, starting a baby on solids such as cereals makes no difference in their night-waking patterns. The research shows that as babies get older, they tend to wake less often and tend to need feeding at night less often.

We hope it will be reassuring to know that breastfeeding mothers and their partners actually get more about 45 minutes more per night and better sleep more deep sleep than mothers who formula-feed their babies. Clearly, while many parents may want their babies to sleep through the night, it is very unusual.

It may also be risky until a baby is older. However, we do know that breastfeeding is an important means of helping protect your infant against SIDS. A careful review of studies on SIDS and breastfeeding and meta-analysis of 18 of those studies showed that breastfeeding protects babies against SIDS, and exclusive breastfeeding increases the protective effect. You are giving your baby the best start in life by breastfeeding him or her.

Nursing at night is part of that gift, yet we well know how hard it can be! If you are struggling with fatigue, La Leche League Leaders have information and ideas for maximizing your sleep that may be helpful. Please check our map to find a Leader near you! First, it is very common for your breasts to stop becoming engorged after the first few weeks or sometimes even sooner. Simply continue nursing your baby when she signals hunger cues, and your body will know how much milk is needed.

Second, if your baby is becoming fussy, there can be many reasons besides an inadequate milk supply. Is your baby producing enough wet and poopy diapers? If she is producing the right number of wet or poopy diapers for the age, there may be other reasons for fussiness. Babies can be fussy due to teething, muscles that are aching because the baby has been trying to learn to pick up objects, creep, or crawl, or due to other things going on in the household. They have only one way of communicating their needs—through their feeding cues or their crying—and those needs are all about hunger or discomfort of one type or another.

Even their need for you is a need, not a want. Remember, as we said in response to another question, nursing your baby offers your baby food, water, and you—and all three are very important to your baby. Breastfeeding a baby is as much about fulfilling that need for closeness as it is about feeding. The first two months after birth are a time of the most rapid growth your baby will experience in her first year. There will be days when she seems to do nothing but eat! Fortunately, every time you nurse her, you will be telling your body to make more milk.

After that first two months, there may be a few other times when your baby seems to increase her nursing frequency and maybe her fussiness as well.

Throughout the first year as well as during other periods of development , needs for more food or fussiness may occur. This works for pain relief when your baby is being given vaccinations, too!

If your baby is right around six months of age, increased nursing can indicate he is about ready to start solids. Can he sit up on his own? Can he pick up small objects between his thumb and forefinger? If you try to put something in his mouth, does he push it right back out with his tongue?

Please see our information on starting solids. While some people do make a lot of milk, there may be other factors leading to choking when your baby tries to nurse, and those need to be ruled out first.

Sometimes choking is caused by uncoordinated sucking and swallowing; other times it may be due to tongue-tie, positioning issues, respiratory problems or congestion. One of the first things to try in this case is changes in your positioning. Certain positions seem to be more problematic for some babies, so trying a different position can make a big difference.

For example, many people have found that laid-back breastfeeding is very helpful, as it offers your baby more control over the milk flow and makes it easier for him or her to coordinate suckling, swallowing, and breathing.